Tag Archives: Toronto

Golden House Chinese Food Restaurant

 

Dim sum at Shui Wah in Chicago.

 

The contemporary Chinese food we eat today is virtually unrecognizable from the recipes that the first Chinese immigrants in the 1800’s brought to our shore, as signature dishes have undergone a complete overhaul in order to appeal to western culinary sensibilities. Restaurants serving Dim Sum, however, may be the last vestiges of truly authentic Chinese food in North America. Offering a selective spread of Dim Sum dishes and contemporary Chinese food, Golden House Chinese Food Restaurant in Toronto take on Chinese cooking has made it a hit among locals and tourists alike.

Visit Golden House Chinese Food Restaurant

1280 Yonge St

Toronto, Ontario, M4T 1W5

416-961-2710


Three powerful ingredients

cropped-garlic-gonion-ginger.jpg

Ginger or ginger root is the rhizome of the plant Zingiber offinale, consumed as a spice, medicine or delicacy. Ginger cultivation began in South Asia and has since spread to East Africa and the Caribbean.

Onion is used as a vegetable and is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. This genus also contains several other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food.

Chopped scallions

The onion plant has a fan of hollow, bluish-green leaves and the bulb at the base of the plant begins to swell when a certain day-length is reached. Onions are cultivated and used around the world. As a foodstuff they are usually served cooked, as a vegetable or part of a prepared savoury dish, but can also be eaten raw or used to make pickles or chutneys. Consumption is believed to benefit health in that onions contain phenolics and flavonoid.

Green onions are young shoots of bulb onions, and are milder tasting than large bulb onions. They have a small, not fully developed white bulb end with long green stalks. Both parts are edible.

These 3 powerful ingredients have the ability to enhance any dish.

Visit Golden House Chinese Food Restaurant, 1280 Yonge st, Toronto, Ontario as 70% of their menu items are made up of the above 3 ingredients.

www.goldenhouserestaurant.com


The best Cantonese Chow Mein

golden house chinese food restaurant

Golden House Chinese Food Restaurant located at 1280 yonge street, Toronto, Ontario. Like them on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/golden.house.754?fref=ts

Tucked away in Rosedale/Summerhill in Toronto, this western style Chinese restaurant has many great dishes. My all time favourite would be the Cantonese chow mein – hands down the portion sizes are large, the service is quick, the price is decent and it’s a family run restaurant making it very cozy.

Golden House has been around for 25 years in Toronto. This restaurant services to the corporate crowd during the weekday lunch hours and feeds the residential neighbourhood for take aways and deliveries.

Other chief suggestions and my recommendations:

BBQ sparerib, Crispy shrimp in salted chili pepper, general tao chicken (was there really a general?) and lastly shrimp with snowpeas.

mmmmmm, it truly is a Golden House.


The new era of Chinese style cooking: Cheap Eats

Eating is a dominant aspect of Chinese culture, and in China, eating out is one of the most common ways to honour guests. Similar to Westerners, eating together in China is a way to socialize and deepen friendships.

Table etiquette is very important to Chinese people. In Chinese culture, using correct table manners is believed to bring “luck” while incorrect use will bring shame. Similarly, table etiquette indicates children’s educational status: holding chopsticks incorrectly leaves a bad impression and shames the parents, who have the responsibility of teaching them. In casual settings, and sometimes with the youth, many of these table manners go by the wayside. In formal settings, if you watch closely, these table manners become more apparent.

When we use the term ‘cheap eats’ and ‘Toronto’ – table etiquette does not apply.

In the 19th century, Chinese in San Francisco operated sophisticated and sometimes luxurious restaurants patronized mainly by Chinese, while restaurants in smaller towns served what their customers requested, ranging from pork chop sandwiches and apple pie to beans and eggs. These smaller restaurants developed Western Chinese cuisine when they modified their food to suit a more Western palate. First catering to miners and railroad workers, they established new eateries in towns where Chinese food was completely unknown, adapting local ingredients and catering to their customers’ tastes.

Stir frying, pan frying, and deep frying tend to be the most common Chinese cooking techniques used in Western Chinese cuisine, which are all easily done using a wok.

Golden House